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A child of the Jago. by Arthur Morrison

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Published by Chivers in Bath .
Written in English


Book details:

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20292405M

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Arthur Morrison's novel 'A Child Of The Jago' was first published in and still packs a punch. The story of young Dicky Perrott, growing up in an infamous slum neighbourhood located just off Shoreditch High Street in late Victorian London, is a tale of survival in adversity. The descriptions of life in a hell-hole packed to/5(27). Jay’s third book, A Story of Shoreditch, appeared shortly before A Child of the Jago was published, and the crossover between the two is notable, both in the use of specific Nichol incidents and the bleak despair at the notion of ineradicable, biologically transmitted criminality and indigence. The parallels were not lost on the unsigned. Arthur Morrison's novel 'A Child Of The Jago' was first published in and still packs a punch. The story of young Dicky Perrott, growing up in an infamous slum neighbourhood located just off Shoreditch High Street in late Victorian London, is a tale of survival in adversity. The descriptions of life in a hell-hole packed toCited by: As it was in the time of the Jago, the street is our stage! We are not a part of the ‘fashion system’ producing mass conformity and consumption; our clothes are designed to look great until they rot off your back whatever the year or season! HENCHMAN JACKET IN BLACK ALPACA. HENCHMAN JACKET IN BROWN ALPACA. RUMPAD COAT IN BROWN ALPACA.

A Child Of The Jago - Charing Cross Road, WC2H 0BD London, United Kingdom - Rated based on Reviews "Only shopped there for 12 months /5(). A Child of the Jago By Arthur Morrison Author of ‘Tales of Mean Streets’ Third Edition PREFACE TO THE THIRD EDITION I am glad to take this, the first available opportunity, to acknowledge the kindness with which _A Child of the Jago_ has been received: both by the reading public, from which I have received many gratifying assurances that what I have tried to say has not /5(17).   The book opens with a thorough introduction covering biographical and contextual information Appendices include the debates prompted by A Child of the Jago around the nature of realist fiction, writings on the world of the slum from contemporary researchers and reformers focusing especially on middle-class attitudes, childhood, women’s Pages: The Project Gutenberg EBook of A Child of the Jago, by Arthur Morrison This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at Title: A Child of the Jago.

Morrison's most famous novel is A Child of the Jago, published in , The novel described in graphic detail living conditions in the East End, including the permeation of violence into everyday life (it was a barely fictionalized account of life in the Old Nichol Street Rookery). (Introduction by Wikipedia and Algy Pug) First Page:3/5(1). The book opens with a thorough introduction covering biographical and contextual information Appendices include the debates prompted by A Child of the Jago around the nature of realist fiction, writings on the world of the slum from contemporary researchers and reformers focusing especially on middle-class attitudes, childhood, women's labor /5(17). This novel, first published in , is the story of Dick Perrot, born and bred in the Jago; but it is also a brilliant portrait of the community. The Jago is a London slum where crime and violence are the only way of life, and from which there is no escape for the inhabitants. Only the characters themselves are fictional: Morrison's descriptions of the fearful physical conditions are based /5(4). Page - Jago ere its influence suck him under for ever; leaving for his own community none but the entirely vicious. And among these he spent his life: preaching little, in the common sense, for that were but idle vanity in this place; but working, alleviating, growing into the Jago life, flinging scorn and ridicule on evil things, grateful for tiny negative successes — for keeping a 5/5(1).